5 strange Christmas traditions from around the World

5 strange Christmas traditions from around the World

5 strange Christmas traditions from around the World

Written by Nathasha De Alwis

08 Dec, 2018 | 8:00 am

Colombo (News1st): It’s no secret that we’re nuts for Christmas traditions, decorating our house from wall to wall and immersing ourselves in celebrations. Here are five strange Christmas traditions from around the world.

1.The Yule Lads, Iceland

In the 13 days leading up to Christmas, 13 tricksy troll-like characters come out to play in Iceland. The Yule Lads (jólasveinarnir or jólasveinar in Icelandic) visit the children across the country over the 13 nights leading up to Christmas.

For each night of Yuletide, children place their best shoes by the window and a different Yule Lad visits them and leaves good children gifts and rotting potatoes for the naughty ones.

Clad in traditional Icelandic costume, these fellas are pretty mischievous, and their names hint at the type of trouble they like to cause:

  • Stekkjastaur (Sheep-Cote Clod)
  • Giljagaur (Gully Gawk)
  • Stúfur (Stubby)
  • Þvörusleikir (Spoon-Licker)
  • Pottaskefill (Pot-Scraper)
  • Askasleikir (Bowl-Licker)
  • Hurðaskellir (Door-Slammer)
  • Skyrgámur (Skyr-Gobbler)
  • Bjúgnakrækir (Sausage-Swiper)
  • Gluggagægir (Window-Peeper)
  • Gáttaþefur (Doorway-Sniffer)
  • Ketkrókur (Meat-Hook)
  • Kertasníkir (Candle-Stealer)

2. Gävle Goat, Sweden

Since 1966, a 13-metre-tall Yule Goat has been built in the centre of Gävle’s Castle Square for the Advent, but this Swedish Christmas tradition has unwittingly led to another “tradition” of sorts – people trying to burn it down. Since 1966 the Goat has been successfully burned down 29 times – the most recently in 2016.

3. Krampus, Austria

In Austrian tradition, St. Nicholas rewards good boys and girls, while Krampus is said to capture the naughtiest children and whisk them away in his sack. In the first week of December, young men dress up as the Krampus (especially on the eve of St. Nicholas Day) frightening children with clattering chains and bells.

4. Saint Nicholas’ Day, Germany

Not to be confused with Weihnachtsmann (Father Christmas), Nikolaus travels by donkey in the middle of the night on December 6 (Nikolaus Tag) and leaves little treats like coins, chocolate, oranges and toys in the shoes of good children all over Germany.

St. Nicholas also visits children in schools or at home and in exchange for sweets or a small present each child must recite a poem, sing a song or draw a picture. In short, he’s a great guy. But it isn’t always fun and games.

St. Nick often brings along Knecht Ruprecht (Farmhand Rupert). A devil-like character dressed in dark clothes covered with bells and a dirty beard, Knecht Ruprecht carries a stick or a small whip in hand to punish children who misbehave.

5. Hiding brooms, Norway

Perhaps one of the most unorthodox Christmas Eve traditions can be found in Norway, where people hide their brooms. It’s a tradition that dates back centuries to when people believed that witches and evil spirits came out on Christmas Eve looking for brooms to ride on. To this day, many people still hide their brooms in the safest place in the house to stop them from being stolen.


Are you interested in advertising on our website or video channel
Please contact us at [email protected]