Everyone should start a fixed deposit of oxygen: India Environment Min. Prakash Javadekar

Everyone should start a fixed deposit of oxygen: India Environment Min. Prakash Javadekar

Everyone should start a fixed deposit of oxygen: India Environment Min. Prakash Javadekar

Written by Staff Writer

21 Mar, 2016 | 4:34 pm

India’s Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar speaking on the occasion of International Forest Day, on Monday, March 21, appealed to people to do their bit to conserve oxygen for the future. Javadekar made the remarks at an event in New Delhi, where he led a Nature Walk with a group of school children.

The environment minister and the students also planted trees in the Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary. The children later performed a skit on saving forests and enthralled the audience. The environment minister requested people to start making fixed deposits of oxygen for the future, equating it with such monetary deposits made in banks.

“Every person should start making fixed deposits of oxygen. For old age, people save money in banks as fixed deposits, but oxygen is more important to live. Fixed deposits of oxygen is possible if a person plants a tree every five-seven years and takes care of it while it grows.

If there is no space nearby, you can plant the tree somewhere where there is enough space. So, if a person plants a tree every five-seven years, then we can say that we have made our fixed deposits of oxygen,” said Javadekar. Javadekar also commented on how students could be the salvation for future generations.

“I believe that students are the agents of change. The changes in the environment that are about to come, if anyone can save and carry on the dynamics of the new environment, it can be a student. And that is the reason why students are the agents of change,” he said. International Forest Day is celebrated on March 21, every year. It is celebrated to promote awareness on the importance of forests and trees to ensure sustainability of ecosystems, to provide valuable goods and services, and to support livelihoods.

In a survey conducted in 2015, figures show that while 2,511 sq km of prime forests have disappeared altogether, 1,135 sq km of non-forest areas have become either very dense or mid-dense forests during that time.

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