‘Tiny machines’ scientists win chemistry Nobel prize

‘Tiny machines’ scientists win chemistry Nobel prize

‘Tiny machines’ scientists win chemistry Nobel prize

Written by Staff Writer

05 Oct, 2016 | 4:18 pm

The 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been awarded for the development of the world’s smallest machines.

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work developing tiny machines at the molecular level, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

They were named at a press conference in Sweden.

The machines conceived by today’s laureates are a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair.

‘They have developed molecules with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added,’ the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement awarding the 8 million Swedish crown ($931,000/£732,004) prize.

They could slip inside to human body to deliver drugs from within – for instance, applying pharmaceuticals directly to cancer cells.

This field of nanotechnology could also yield applications in the design of smart materials.

The prize recognises their success in linking molecules together to design everything from motors to a car and muscles on a tiny scale.

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