UN working group reveals findings on disappearances

UN working group reveals findings on disappearances

UN working group reveals findings on disappearances

Written by Staff Writer

18 Nov, 2015 | 9:49 pm

After ten days of interviewing families of victims who are reported to be missing, the United Nations Working Group on Enforced and Involuntary Disappearances, publicly revealed its findings to a packed news conference .

Vice Chair Bernard Duhaime of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances stated that they are happy about the actions taken by the government on enforced disappearances in a systematic way.

He went on to note that it is unacceptable in democratic society to see families been harassed due to their meeting with them.

He added that the the Prevention of Terrorism act should be repealed since it contains several provisions that can create enforced disappearances or create a climate where enforced disappearances could occur.

Panel member, Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, Ariel Dulitzky stated that during their meeting with President Sirisena they had come to a conclusion where their finding could be based on four words – anguish, mistrust, fear and hope.

He went on to note that they had visited several mass grave sites as they are concerned with the technical capacity to conduct proper exhumations or DNA tests.

Panel Member, Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, Tae-Ung Baik stated that the working group had received information where authorities had imposed death certificates in exchange of compensation.

He went on to note that they are concerned since the death certificates were sent to family members without their express request or information.

Questions were also raised on the Trincomalee Naval Camp.

Vice Chair Bernard Duhaim of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances stated that there had been people in the Trincomalee Detention Centre until 2010.

Panel Member of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, Tae-Ung Baik stated that there were more than 12 prison cells in total in different complexes and at least 12 rooms.

He added that they do not know when it was put into use initially, or till when it had been used.

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