SL on the verge of declaring a ‘state of emergency’ over Dengue as GMOA strikes again

SL on the verge of declaring a ‘state of emergency’ over Dengue as GMOA strikes again

By Lahiru Fernando

May 22, 2017 | 7:49 am

Experts are on the verge of declaring a ‘State of Emergency’ over the ongoing Dengue crisis. At present, state health services have been overwhelmed with a continuous rise in Dengue patients.

The months from January to May are usually considered “Mild and low Dengue season”. However, over 47,000 Dengue patients have been reported so far in 2017 with 125 reported deaths.

The National Hospital – 160 fever patients, 100 of them suffering with Dengue.

The Kalubowila Teaching Hospital – 119 dengue patients.

Gampaha Hospital – 147 fever patients, 93 of them are suspected dengue patients.
* According to reports, 10 of the 93 are children.

Ragama Teaching Hospital – 148 fever patients, 35 of them are Dengue patients.

Chilaw Base Hospital – 20 Dengue patients.

Despite the rise in numbers and overwhelming patients….,

The GMOA decides to strike. Again.

The Government Medical Officers’ Association will be launching another 24 hour token strike today (May 22).

Why are they striking again?

The token strike was announced against Police firing tear gas at university students, who protested against SAITM while defying a court order issued against protesting in a way which would inconvenience the public.

According to the GMOA, the strike will not affect:

  • Maternity hospitals
  • Paediatric hospitals
  • Cancer hospitals
  • Military hospitals
  • Kidney treatment units
Dr. Nalinda Herath

Dr. Nalinda Herath

The greater good?

GMOA’s editor Dr. Nalinda Herath says that they will not put the life of any patient under threat through the strike. But he says the temporary inconvenience caused to patients is “for their own greater good”.

He says the government should be held responsible for the “temporary inconvenience”.

“Disappointed about the protest”

Minister Mahinda Amaraweera says the government is disappointed about the protest against SAITM.

“Even though I mostly spoke towards that side, today I think that this protest is becoming quite an unfair one”, he said.

“To whom is the loss?”, questioned the minister. “It is profitable to the government, because electricity isn’t used, ambulances do not operate and medicines aren’t issued. So, it is the innocent people who have to suffer.”

“It is wrong to hold protests by holding patients as hostages,” pointed out Minister Amaraweera.